No evidence that behavioural therapies are any better than other psychological therapies for depression

Depression is a big problem.  In fact, it’s the third leading cause of disease burden worldwide (WHO, 2004 – as cited in Shinohara et al, 2013) and the largest source of nonfatal disease burden in the world (Ustun, 2004 – as cited in Shinohara et al, 2013).   What’s more, the number of people affected by it is predicted to increase over the next two decades (WHO, 2008 – as cited in Shinohara et al, 2013). 

NICE recommends both pharmacological and psychological interventions for depression, either independently or in combination.  Surveys tell us that there is a patient preference for psychological interventions (Churchill, 2000; Riedel-Heller, 2005 – as cited in Shinohara et al, 2013), which means it would be helpful to know exactly which elements of the psychological intervention are the most effective so that we can maximise this efficacy where possible.

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